Archive of all posts

The legacy of Daisy Lloyd: A brief history of black Hoosier women in office

The first black woman to hold any state office passed away recently with little media coverage. That would have been unimaginable when she blazed the trail a half-century ago.

Mayor for life: The secret to Dick Lugar’s success

Want to understand Senator Dick Lugar’s approach to government? Then study Mayor Dick Lugar. Here’s a look at fascinating local history that was forgotten in the wake of his national achievement.

Mr. Bayh goes to Indianapolis: A look at Birch Bayh as State Representative

Before Birch Bayh became a “modern day Founding Father” in the U.S. Senate, he served in the Indiana General Assembly. But there’s been virtually nothing written about his four terms there, until now.

A brief history of Indiana’s female legislators

Julia Nelson never set out to be the first woman elected to the Indiana General Assembly. She was added to the ballot just days before the 1920 election, beginning an unbroken streak of Hoosier women legislators.

How and why a national wave election translates (or doesn’t) in Indiana

It’s generally assumed that national wave elections wash up on shore in most states. But what does the historical record show about wave elections in Indiana? The answer might surprise you.

A quick look at U.S. Supreme Court Justices from Indiana

With Seventh Circuit Justice Amy Coney Barrett on a short list of potential Supreme Court nominees for President Trump, it begs the question: How many Hoosiers have served on the highest court in the land?

The close convention upset that history mostly forgot

For most Hoosier political junkies, it is the 1968 Indiana Republican Convention that best exemplifies a convention floor fight. But that race was as dramatic as people remember, and it was the Democratic Convention that year that should be remembered.

What’s different about modern conventions?

Modern state party conventions don’t usually feature the drama of those held in the more distant past. Here’s a look at why that seems to be the case, and what used to be at stake.

Historical Odds and Ends: What’s old is new again

As we’ve watched political events in Indiana unfold over the past few weeks, there’s a temptation to suggest that we’re witnessing things that have never happened before. But with more than 200 years of state history to draw on, it turns out that King Solomon was probably right: There is nothing new under the sun.